Soft Sourdough Potato Rolls

I love rolls with seeds, rolled oats and spelt flour, but sometimes I fancy a classic white bread roll with a crispy crust and fluffy, soft crumb. On Sundays like this, I bake potato rolls with sourdough. They are mild and fluffy thanks to the wheat flour, but also aromatic thanks to the long fermentation process and the sourdough. For me, the potato rolls bring back childhood memories of frozen baked rolls (and they pop into the oven just as quickly in the morning). But of course they taste so much better! And don’t worry, the rolls don’t taste like potatoes at all, just like the perfect bread roll from the bakery!

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The perfect sourdough rolls for beginners

If you’re just getting into baking with sourdough and are looking for a recipe for simple sourdough bread rolls, then this is the recipe for you! The dough is firmer than other bread roll doughs with sourdough. Thanks to the potatoes in the dough, the finished rolls are still super fluffy. And they still taste fresh and aromatic on the second day. The dough is easy to work with and hardly sticks at all. The recipe requires no yeast, but also no special ingredients or complicated predoughs. If you want to avoid animal products, you can simply replace butter and milk with vegan alternatives. What’s more, you hardly need any equipment for the recipe: just a bowl, a scale, a hand blender, a spoon for stirring and off you go! If you don’t have a blender, you can also mash the potatoes with a fork. This works best while the potatoes are still warm.

What you need for the potato rolls with sourdough

  • Potatoes: You can use any potatoes. This recipe is also a great way to use leftover potatoes from the previous dinner.
  • Milk: I have baked the recipe with cow’s milk and also in a vegan version with oat milk. Both worked really well.
  • Wheat flour: Bread flour or wheat flour 550 is best for bread and rolls. You can also bake the bread with other wheat flours. For example, you can replace some of the flour with brown flour or wheat flour 1050. The higher the type number of the flour, the more hulls are still contained in the flour. If you want to use wholemeal flour, you may need to increase the amount of water in the recipe.
  • Sourdough starter: I feed my sourdough with equal parts water and flour. For the flour, I use a mixture of wheat flour and wholegrain rye flour. If you feed your sourdough with a different water-to-flour ratio, you will need to adjust the amount of water in the recipe accordingly.
  • Butter: I used a vegan butter alternative. I prefer to use the organic version of Alsan because the consistency is very similar to butter.

Helpful tools – My recommendations

The links with an star* are affiliate links. If you click on one of these links and buy something, I get a small commission and you support my work (thanks for that 🧡). This does not change the price for you. You can find more information on privacy policy here.

  • A Danish Whisk* – especially if you don’t use a kitchen machine. This allows you to mix your ingredients without the whole dough sticking to the spoon.
  • A kitchen scale*.
  • With this sharp baker’s knife*, you can make precise cuts in your bread and get creative with intricate scoring patterns.
  • You can use a stainless steel dough knife* to cut your dough pieces or shape your loaves.
  • A steam tray consisting of a stainless steel oven mould* and lava stones*. The tray is filled with the stones and placed on the bottom of the oven during preheating. When you put your bread in the oven, pour hot water onto the stones. This creates steam, which ensures that your bread rises well.
  • Baking steel* to make your bread, rolls and pizza nice and crispy.
  • A sharp bread knife*.
  • A stainless steel toaster* for slices of bread, toast and rolls.

You can find more product recommendations here.

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Recipe: Soft Sourdough Potato Rolls

If you’re just getting into baking with sourdough and are looking for a recipe for simple sourdough bread rolls, then this is the recipe for you! The dough is firmer than other bread roll doughs with sourdough. The dough is easy to work with and hardly sticks at all. The recipe requires no yeast, but also no special ingredients or complicated predoughs.
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 40 minutes
Resting Time 17 hours
Total Time 18 hours
Course sourdough buns
Cuisine German
Servings 9 Bread rolls

Ingredients
  

  • 130 g potatos boiled and peeled
  • 100 g milk or a vegan alternative
  • 180 g water
  • 470 g wheat flour 550
  • 60 g sourdough starter
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 10 g soft butter or a vegan alternative

Instructions
 

Day 1

  • Mix the water and milk in a tall container. Add the potatoes and blend to a homogeneous mass using a hand blender.
  • Place the mixture in a bowl and mix with the flour, sourdough starter, salt and butter.
  • Cover the dough and allow to rest at room temperature for two hours. Stretch and fold after 30 minutes. Repeat the process two to three times.
  • Then let the dough rest for a further three to five hours until the volume has increased significantly.
  • Place the dough in the fridge overnight or for 8 to 10 hours.

Day 2

  • Transfer the dough to a floured work surface and cut into nine equal pieces.
  • Shape the dough pieces into rolls and allow to rest briefly on the work surface.
  • Then shape the dough pieces under tension to form oval rolls.
  • Cover the rolls and allow to rest for one hour at room temperature or three to four hours in the fridge.
  • Preheat the oven to 270 degrees with the baking steel and steam tray.
  • Roll the rolls in a little flour, place on the baking stone and score the surface.
  • Turn on the steam, reduce the heat to 230 degrees and bake the rolls for 20 to 25 minutes until golden brown. Release the steam after 10 minutes.
  • Happy baking!

Notes

If you don’t have a blender, you can also mash the potatoes with a fork. This works best while the potatoes are still warm.
Potatoes: You can use any potatoes. This recipe is also a great way to use leftover potatoes from the previous dinner.
Milk: I have baked the recipe with cow’s milk and also in a vegan version with oat milk. Both worked really well.
Wheat flour: Bread flour or wheat flour 550 is best for bread and rolls. You can also bake the bread with other wheat flours. For example, you can replace some of the flour with brown flour or wheat flour 1050. The higher the type number of the flour, the more hulls are still contained in the flour. If you want to use wholemeal flour, you may need to increase the amount of water in the recipe.
Sourdough starter: I feed my sourdough with equal parts water and flour. For the flour, I use a mixture of wheat flour and wholegrain rye flour. If you feed your sourdough with a different water-to-flour ratio, you will need to adjust the amount of water in the recipe accordingly.
Butter: I used a vegan butter alternative. I prefer to use the organic version of Alsan because the consistency is very similar to butter.
Keyword easy, no kneading, no yeast, soft

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Easy Sourdough Potato Rolls

Hey, so happy you’re here! 🧡

 

I’m Theresa and I bake – preferably with sourdough. I share my favorite recipes with you on my blog Krümelig.

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